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2030 Climate & Energy Targets

As part of the dynamic leading up to the Paris Climate Summit, almost all European countries have developed greenhouse gas emission reduction targets for 2030. An overview of these targets can be found here. Some of these target are highly problematic, such as the Turkey's woefully inefficient INDC. All targets including the EU's are insufficient to achieve the objective agree in Paris to aim to keep temperature rise below 1.5°C.

The EU 2030 Targets

In October 2014, the European Council agreed on the 2030 climate and energy framework for the EU:

  • a binding EU target of at least 40% less greenhouse gas emissions by 2030, compared to 1990 (This target is divided in a 43% reduction target for the sectors covered by the EU Emission Trading Scheme (EU ETS)and a 30% reduction target for the non-ETS sectors  (Effort Sharing Decision/Regulation).
  • a target, binding at EU level, of at least 27% Renewable Energy  consumption in 2030
  • an indicative target at EU level of at least 27% improvement in energy efficiency in 2030

The EU 2030 targets lack ambition

CAN Europe has been calling for much stronger targets: at least 55% greenhouse gas reduction, a 45% target for renewable energy, binding at the national level and a binding 40% energy savings target.

CAN Europe, together with trade unions, businesses, cities and other stakeholders is calling upon the EU to increase its 2030 targets, in light of the outcome of Paris. See pdf here (773 KB) for a joint statement made by NGOs, businesses and trade unions.

The EU 2030 targets lack clarity

Not only does the EU need to increase its targets, it will also need to guarantee that the legislation that is being developed to implement the targets guarantees the highest level of environmental integrity. 

The EU’s 2030 greenhouse gas reduction target is a so-called single-year target. The EU has not yet defined the emission reductions it wants to achieve in the period 2021 to 2030. Because CO2 and other greenhouse gases stay in the atmosphere for centuries, they build up over time. This is why it is the total cumulative emissions that matter to the atmosphere and that ultimately determine the level of change in our climate.

Depending on policy decisions, the EU’s carbon budget for the period 2021-2030 can vary by a staggering 6 billion tonnes.

In a report titled pdf Gigatonne gap in the EU pledge for Paris Climate Summit (297 KB) CAN Europe translated the EU’s 2030 target of at least 40% emission reductions, into the exact amount of greenhouse gases the EU could emit between 2021 and 2030. The analysis reveals that depending on political choices, the EU’s “carbon budget” for the period from 2021 till 2030 will vary from 37 to 43 billion tonnes of greenhouse gases. This lack of clarity relates to:

 

Latest Publications

  • Letter to MEPs on the election of the President of the Commission

    Dear Member of the European Parliament,    Congratulations on your successful election.   You will have your first opportunity to vote to defend climate tomorrow Tuesday, when the Parliament is expected to vote on the election of the President of the Commission.  
  • Letter to EU environment ministers on EU climate ambition ahead of their informal meeting in July

    Dear Minister, On 11 July, you will be meeting in Helsinki to discuss EU climate ambition ahead of the United Nations Secretary General Climate Action Summit in September. This is a unique opportunity for the EU to announce its determination to step up its commitments under the Paris Agreement and resume its position as a global climate leader, by announcing the EU is ready to enhance its Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC). Climate Action Network Europe is calling on the EU to increase its 2030 domestic greenhouse emission reduction target to at least 65% compared to 1990 emissions.
  • Letter from UN Secretary General urging EU leaders to ramp up climate action

    In a letter to European Council President Donald Tusk leaked by the media last week, U.N. Secretary-General António Guterres urged EU leaders to adopt a long-term vision for a carbon-neutral economy by 2050 and commit to increasing the EU's 2030 climate target to 55 percent reductions in emissions.
See All: Climate & Energy Targets