The Energy Union framework

In 2015, European leaders endorsed the European Commission’s proposal for an Energy Union with a forward-looking climate policy based on “five mutually-reinforcing and closely interrelated dimensions”:

  1. Energy security
  2. A fully integrated energy market
  3. Moderating energy demand
  4. Decarbonising the economy
  5. Research & innovation

The Energy Union also provides a framework for cooperation with countries beyond the EU, particularly in South East Europe.

The Energy Union also provides opportunities for improvements in climate and energy governance. Under current climate and energy policies countries have a huge number of separate planning and reporting obligations. These require streamlining in order to provide a better basis for the transition to a zero carbon economy.

 

Governance of the Energy Union Regulation

In November 2016 the Commission published a proposal for the Governance of the Energy Union Regulation in its 'Clean Energy for All Europeans' package.

The Governance of the Energy Union Regulation brings together policies on energy efficiency, renewables, and governance of climate and energy targets by requesting that Member States develop National Energy and Climate Plans (NECPs) and long term low emission strategies.

Putting these conditions in place offers a unique opportunity to increase climate ambition and speed up the energy transition in Europe – if the legislation is done right.

Unfortunately however, the Commission’s original proposal for the Governance of the Energy Union Regulation fell far short of expectations. Without national binding targets for renewables and energy efficiency or other adequate measures the regulation lacks the teeth to drive investments in these sectors. The proposal does not properly link short term planning with long term objectives and do not include a robust mechanism to scale up ambition over time.

The European Parliament, the Council and the Commission are currently trying to agree on the final format of the regulation in so-called Trilogues negotiations.

CAN Europe is working to shape the proposal for the Governance Regulation through advocacy work in Brussels and with our network to influence MEPs and decision-makers in Member States. You can read more about CAN Europe’s position on the Governance Regulation here.

 

Learn more

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Priorities for trilogue negotiations on the Governance regulation

There is a wide gap between the positions taken by the European Parliament and the Council on this important file. Read more

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National Energy and Climate Plans (NECPs)

National Energy and Climate Plans (NECPs) are the new framework within which EU Member States have to plan, in an integrated manner, their climate and energy objectives, targets, policies and measures to the European Commission. Read more

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Five things you should know about Energy Union Governance

This briefing sets out key elements of the Regulation and how it needs to be strengthened to meet its potential for managing the low carbon transition. Read more

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CAN Europe position on the regulation on the Governance of the Energy Union

The Commission proposal contains some positive elements but does not provide incentives for Member states to make appropriately ambitious pledges on renewables and energy efficiency. Read more

 

Contact

veerle

Veerle Dossche
EU Energy Policy Coordinator
veerle /at/ caneurope.org
+32 2894 4672

DORA

Theodora Petroula
Energy Savings Policy Coordinator
dora/at/caneurope.org
+32 2894 4671

Latest Publications Energy Union & Governance

  • Countries kick off cooperation on offshore wind potential in the Baltic Sea

    Eight countries(1) located around the Baltic Sea signed today, together with the European Commission, the Baltic Sea Offshore Wind Joint Declaration of Intent. This looks into intensifying the cooperation in offshore wind development as “cost-efficient and environmentally sustainable deployment of offshore wind, through voluntary cooperation will be crucial to ensure a clean, secure and affordable energy supply” for the involved countries.
  • European Parliament asks for a faster and deeper renovation of buildings

    The members of the European Parliament (EP) have voted for maximising the energy efficiency potential of the EU building stock[1], calling on the European Commission to develop consistent measures to stimulate a faster and deeper renovation of buildings. Buildings consume 40 percent of all energy in the EU and emit 36 percent of the region’s CO₂, being the largest single energy consumer[2] and having significant potential in reducing energy demand[3].
  • Hogan's resignation opens the door for a climate-aware trade commissioner

    Von der Leyen should look for a commissioner that brings trade policy in line with climate ambition to limit temperature rise to 1.5°C, after her trade chief, Phil Hogan, resigned yesterday evening.
  • Disarm fossil fuel firms

    Two recent examples of the Dutch and German coal exit show how fossil fuel firms are using an outdated international investment treaty, the Energy Charter Treaty, to attack climate policies. The treaty provides fossil fuel companies with a strong tool to impede the clean energy transition. It is time to disarm them, writes Wendel Trio, director of Climate Action Network (CAN) Europe.
See All: Energy Union & Governance