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Austria’s preference for coal rather than climate finance shamed at COP24 Fossil of the Day Award

10.12.2018 | Press Releases

Today Austria won the shameful Fossil of the Day Award from Climate Action Network (CAN) International. Austria was given this dubious award because it is failing as the president of the EU to end subsidies to coal power plants in the current EU electricity market negotiations, while the the bloc...

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US delegation at COP24 swimming against the tide on coal

10.12.2018 | Press Releases

Commenting on the US delegation side event promoting coal at COP24 today, Joanna Flisowska from CAN Europe said:

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CCPI: European countries fail to take adequate climate action

09.12.2018 | Press Releases

The Climate Change Performance Index 2019 (CCPI), published today at the climate summit COP24 by Germanwatch, the NewClimate Institute and Climate Action Network (CAN) shows that three years after the adoption of the Paris Agreement, none of the 56 evaluated countries nor the EU are doing enough to achieve the...

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Unique ‘Coalition for Higher Ambition’ calls upon the EU to step up at COP24

08.12.2018 | Press Releases

As the first week of this year’s climate summit COP24 draws to a close, a unique gathering of businesses, investors, local authorities, trade unions and NGOs are calling upon EU Ministers arriving at the COP next week to commit to significantly increase the current EU climate commitments by 2020, in...

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Featured Publications

Infographic: Costs of inaction on climate change in Europe

07.09.2018 | Presentations & Infographics

This infographic shows that climate-related extreme weather events already cost Europe dearly. It also shows that the future costs of climate change depend very much on how fast we cut carbon emissions and will be significantly reduced if we keep temperature rise to 1.5C.

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Infographic: Higher ambition, greater benefits

18.04.2018 | Presentations & Infographics

In the context of the negotiations concerning the legislative proposals on the Renewable Energy Directive and the Energy Efficiency Directive, Member States need to support strong renewable energy and energy efficiency targets for 2030.

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Infographic: 3 pillars for a Paris-compatible EU budget

22.02.2018 | Presentations & Infographics

How can the next EU budget serve higher climate ambition?

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2030 Climate & Energy Targets

As part of the dynamic leading up to the Paris Climate Summit, almost all European countries have developed greenhouse gas emission reduction targets for 2030. An overview of these targets can be found here. Some of these target are highly problematic, such as the Turkey's woefully inefficient INDC. All targets including the EU's are insufficient to achieve the objective agree in Paris to aim to keep temperature rise below 1.5°C.

The EU 2030 Targets

In October 2014, the European Council agreed on the 2030 climate and energy framework for the EU:

  • a binding EU target of at least 40% less greenhouse gas emissions by 2030, compared to 1990 (This target is divided in a 43% reduction target for the sectors covered by the EU Emission Trading Scheme (EU ETS)and a 30% reduction target for the non-ETS sectors  (Effort Sharing Decision/Regulation).
  • a target, binding at EU level, of at least 27% Renewable Energy  consumption in 2030
  • an indicative target at EU level of at least 27% improvement in energy efficiency in 2030

The EU 2030 targets lack ambition

CAN Europe has been calling for much stronger targets: at least 55% greenhouse gas reduction, a 45% target for renewable energy, binding at the national level and a binding 40% energy savings target.

CAN Europe, together with trade unions, businesses, cities and other stakeholders is calling upon the EU to increase its 2030 targets, in light of the outcome of Paris. See pdf here (773 KB) for a joint statement made by NGOs, businesses and trade unions.

The EU 2030 targets lack clarity

Not only does the EU need to increase its targets, it will also need to guarantee that the legislation that is being developed to implement the targets guarantees the highest level of environmental integrity. 

The EU’s 2030 greenhouse gas reduction target is a so-called single-year target. The EU has not yet defined the emission reductions it wants to achieve in the period 2021 to 2030. Because CO2 and other greenhouse gases stay in the atmosphere for centuries, they build up over time. This is why it is the total cumulative emissions that matter to the atmosphere and that ultimately determine the level of change in our climate.

Depending on policy decisions, the EU’s carbon budget for the period 2021-2030 can vary by a staggering 6 billion tonnes.

In a report titled pdf Gigatonne gap in the EU pledge for Paris Climate Summit (297 KB) CAN Europe translated the EU’s 2030 target of at least 40% emission reductions, into the exact amount of greenhouse gases the EU could emit between 2021 and 2030. The analysis reveals that depending on political choices, the EU’s “carbon budget” for the period from 2021 till 2030 will vary from 37 to 43 billion tonnes of greenhouse gases. This lack of clarity relates to:

 

CANEurope RT @fmarcellesi: Austria receives the #fossiloftheday in #COP24 for supporting subsidies to #coal power plants in the #MarketDesign negotia…
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CANEurope 🇦🇹wins #FossiloftheDay prize for its preference for #coal rather than climate finance. @EU2018AT must instead lead… https://t.co/5Y4OnB95Y9
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CANEurope RT @Germanwatch: #Germany ranks 27th in the #CCPI2019 with an overall "medium" performance. No country reaches the rating “very high” as na…
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